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Before The Tabernacle
http://eucharisticadoration.com/articles/115/1/Before-The-Tabernacle/Page1.html
By Anne Van Tilburg
Published on 12/26/2007
 
Before The Tabernacle

Before the Tabernacle

Pause before the Tabernacle by yourself, for no special reason, even without saying a thing, simply remaining in His Presence, contemplating the supreme gestures of love contained in the consecrated Bread.  Learn to remain with Him, to be able to love like Him.  When you can, during the week take part in Holy Mass.  Fidelity to the weekday Eucharist helps us to follow Christ in daily life, and gives us light and strength as we follow our vocation.

Look to Mary! She welcomed the infinite mystery of the love of the Triune God in her person and in her life.

At the Annunciation Mary conceived the Son of God in the physical reality of his body and blood, thus anticipating within herself what to some degree happens sacramentally in every believer who receives, under the signs of bread and wine, the Lord's body and blood.

Mary also anticipated, in the mystery of the incarnation, the Church's Eucharistic faith. When, at the Visitation, she bore in her womb the Word made flesh, she became in some way a “tabernacle” – the first “tabernacle” in history – in which the Son of God, still invisible to our human gaze, allowed himself to be adored by Elizabeth, radiating his light as it were through the eyes and the voice of Mary.

In continuity with the Virgin's faith, in the Eucharistic mystery we are asked to believe that the same Jesus Christ, Son of God and Son of Mary, becomes present in his full humanity and divinity under the signs of bread and wine.

Mary, throughout her life at Christ's side and not only on Calvary, made her own the sacrificial dimension of the Eucharist.  When she brought the child Jesus to the Temple in Jerusalem “to present him to the Lord”, she heard the aged Simeon announce that the child would be a “sign of contradiction” and that a sword would also pierce her own heart.

The tragedy of her Son's crucifixion was thus foretold, and in some sense Mary's Stabat Mater at the foot of the Cross was foreshadowed.  In her daily preparation for Calvary, Mary experienced a kind of “anticipated Eucharist” – one might say a “spiritual communion” – of desire and of oblation, which would culminate in her union with her Son in his passion, and then find expression after Easter by her partaking in the Eucharist which the Apostles celebrated as the memorial of that passion.

In the Eucharist the Church is completely united to Christ and his sacrifice, and makes her own the spirit of Mary. This truth can be understood more deeply by re-reading the Magnificat in a Eucharistic key. The Eucharist, like the Canticle of Mary, is first and foremost praise and thanksgiving. 

When Mary exclaims: “My soul magnifies the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour”, she already bears Jesus in her womb. She praises God “through” Jesus, but she also praises him “in” Jesus and “with” Jesus. This is itself the true “Eucharistic attitude”.

If the Church and the Eucharist are inseparably united, the same ought to be said of Mary and the Eucharist. This is one reason why, since ancient times, the commemoration of Mary has always been part of the Eucharistic celebrations of the Churches of East and West.

The Eucharist has been given to us so that our life, like that of Mary, may become completely a Magnificat!

Source:  Pope John Paul II Statements